Current uses of Cloud Vitamin B3 (Niacinamide)

CURRENT USES OF CLOUD VITAMIN B3 (NIACINAMIDE)


OVERVIEW

Cloud Vitamin B3, or niacinamide, applied once to twice a day on wet skin can improve skin concerns such as acne, eczema, dry skin, rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, as well as hyperpigmentation, including melasma. It is also beneficial for anti-aging concerns, as it is able to improve skin elasticity, reduce wrinkles and brighten the skin.

  1. ACNE

Research shows that niacinamide, or vitamin B3 effectively reduces acne. A journal article titled, “Nicotinamide – biologic actions of an emerging cosmetic ingredient”, explored the efficacy of niacinamide as a treatment for acne and reported that, “A 4% nicotinamide gel has been compared to clindamycin 1% gel over a period of 12 weeks applied twice daily.” [1] The study found that, “After 8 weeks both treatments produced comparable beneficial results, 82% of the patients treated with Nicotinamide and 68% treated with clindamycin gel were considered improved.” [1] This is very useful in patients wanting to avoid antibiotics

  1. DRY SKIN & ECZEMA

DRY SKIN –ASTEATOSIS

New studies are finding that niacinamide is an extremely effective ingredient for the treatment and prevention of dry skin. According to an article in the “Journal of Drugs in Dermatology” titled, “Two Randomized, Controlled, Comparative Studies of the Stratum Corneum Integrity Benefits of Two Cosmetic Niacinamide/Glycerin Body Moisturizers vs. Conventional body Moisturizers” stated that, “After evaluation in two 35-day clinical studies, the two niacinamide /glycerin formulas demonstrated an overall better solution towards rapid and prolonged improvement of cosmetic xerosis due to their improvement of the stratum corneum barrier function compared to no treatment and other moisturizers tested.” [2]


ATOPIC DERMATITIS

Scientific research also shows that niacinamide is an excellent alternative for the treatment of eczema. An article from the “International Journal of Cosmetic Science” titled, “Nicotinamide – biologic actions of an emerging cosmetic ingredient” asserts that, “Besides numerous other anti-inflammatory effects, Nicotinamide is capable of stabilizing mast cells and leukocytes, exerting considerable histamine-release blocking activity.” The article adds that, “Nicotinamide should be capable of stabilizing the epidermal barrier homeostasis by increasing the level of ceramides and free fatty acids in the stratum corneum and thus decreasing transepidermal water loss.” [3]


III. ACNE ROSACEA

For those that would like an alternative treatment to aid in the reduction of rosacea flushing and blushing, niacinamide, or vitamin B3, is an effective option. An article from “Cutis” called “Niacinamide-Containing Facial Moisturizer Improves Skin Barrier and Benefits Subjects with Rosacea” explored the ability of niacinamide to reduce rosacea symptoms. The article reported that, “There was a marked decrease in erythema severity over the 4-week treatment phase. Using the niacinamide-containing facial moisturizer also improved dryness and scaling/peeling and decreased inflammatory lesion counts.” This confirms evidence that niacinamide is able to reduce redness, or erythema, in the skin caused by rosacea. The article went on to assert that, “After 2 weeks of using the facial moisturizer, 79.2% of subjects show global improvement.” [6]

  1. MELASMA

Niacinamide, or vitamin B3, has also been proven to reduce hyperpigmentation, or melasma, safely and effectively. A recent article from “Dermatology Research and Practice” titled, “A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial of Niacinamide 4% versus Hydroquinone 4% in the treatment of Melasma” stated that, “Good to excellent improvement was observed with niacinamide in 44% of patients, compared to 55% with hydroquinone.” The article went on to add that, “We propose niacinamide as an effective, integral, and safe therapeutic alternative in the melasma treatment, since it not only reduces pigmentation and inflammation, but also may reduce solar degenerative changes with minimal adverse events.” The article also reported that, “Treatment with niacinamide showed no significant side effects and was well tolerated; therefore, it could be used for longer periods, as part of the initial hyperpigmentation treatment and as a maintenance drug.” [4]

  1. SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS

Topical vitamin B3, or niacinamide, is proving to have particularly positive effects on patients dealing with seborrheic dermatitis. An article titled, “Topical Nicotinamide for Seborrheic Dermatitis:  an open randomized study” outlines a study that indicated significant improvement to seborrheic dermatitis with the use of topical niacinamide cream. The study assessed erythema (redness), scaling, and infiltration. According to the article, “In comparison with baseline, a reduction of 75% of the total score was observed in patients treated with NCT (topical nicotinamide), whereas for placebo-treated patients the reduction was of 35%.” [5] These results are significant because not only is topical niacinamide effective in improving seborrheic dermatitis, it is also easy to apply, is affordable, has a low instance of side effects and can be used long-term.

  1. IN THE COSMETIC TREATMENT OF PHOTOAGEING

In an episode from January 10, 2014, Dr. Oz established that vitamin B3 is efficacious in the reduction of fine lines and wrinkles and improving skin elasticity. [7]

The primary author is Bissett improved lines; reduction in hyperpigmentation, reduction in erythema.  We use B3 as an adjunct  to RP, C and E  ((Common Cosmeceuticals Clinics in Derm (2009) 27, 435-45)

  1. International Journal of Cosmetic Science, 2005, 27, 255 – 261, by N. Otte, C. Borelli and H. C. Korting
  2. Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, January 2012, volume 11, Issue 1, “Two Randomized, Controlled, Comparative Studies of the Stratum Corneum Integrity Benefits of Two Cosmetic Niacinamide/Glycerin Body Moisturizers vs. Conventional Body Moisturizers” by Jeremy C. Christman MS, Deborah K. Fix BS MBA, Sawanna C. Lucus BS, Debrah Watson BS, Emma Desmier BS, Rolanda J. Johnson Wilkerson PhD, Charles Fixler MD
  3. International Journal of Cosmetic Science, 2005, 27, 255-261, “Nicotinamide – biologic actions of an emerging cosmetic ingredient” by N. Otte, C. Borelli and H. C. Korting
  4. “Dermatology Research and Practice”, Volume 2011, Article ID 379173 , “A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial of Niacinamide 4% versus Hydroquinone 4% in the treatment of Melasma”, by Josefina Navarrete-Solis, Juan Pablo Castanedo-Cazares, Bertha Torres-Alvarez, Cuauhtemoc Oros-Ovalle, Cornelia Fuentes-Ahumada, Francisco Javier Gonzalez, Juan David Martinez-Ramirez, and Bejamin Moncada
  5. PubMed, “Topical Nicotinamide for Seborrheic Dermatitis:  an open randomized study”, by G. Fabbrocini, M. Cantelli, and G. Monfrecola
  6. Cutis, Volume 76, August 2005, “Niacinamide-Containing Facial Moisturizer Improves Skin Barrier and Benefits Subjects with Rosacea” by Zoe Diana Draelos, MD, Keith Ertel, PhD and Cindy Berge BS
  7. http://www.doctoroz.com/episode/whole-body-anti-aging-guide-2014

RECENT REVIEWS

Rolfe H; J of Cosmetic derm 2014 13,324-8

Cloud Reviews please enter under search box B3 or Niacinamide



June 04, 2015 by Dr. Gordon Telford
previous / next